Tuesday, September 08, 2009

Blowing Shofar on Shabbos

The SHulchan Aruch paskens that a shofar is a kli sh'melachto l'issur on Shabbos and mutar l'tzorech gufo and m'komo. I was wondering why it is not muktza machmas chisaron kis since we would never use it for any other purpose.

I saw that the Shmiras Shabbos quotes Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach Zt"l who makes this point. B'zman hazeh a shofar would be muktza machmas chisaron kis. It was only in the days of the gemara and Shulchan Aruch where they used it for other purposes that it was considered a kli sh'melachto l'issur

8 comments:

Chaim B. said...

what else did they use it for

Art Finkle said...

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Shofar WebPage

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Art Finkle

Chaim Markowitz said...

It's brought down that they used it to drink out of. I know it sounds strange but that's what they say.

Chaim B. said...

Is having only a single dedicated use the criteria of kli she'melachto l'lisur? Pens are used only for writing -- is a 10 cent ballpoint a kli shemelachto l'isur?

Chaim Markowitz said...

I am not sure what you are getting at. However, I think it is a machlokes among contemporary muktzah books. Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen in his muktzah book goes to great length to differentiate between 2 classes of kli she'melachto l'issur. Class 1 are those objects which have multiple uses but primarily is used for issur-like a hammer. These objects are muttar l'tzorech gufo u'm'komo. Class 2 would be objects whose sole purpose is for issur-you would really not use it for anything else. These objects are the subject to a machlokes achronim whether they are assur l'tzorech gufo. (I don't recall if he said they were also assur l'tzorech m'komo).

He has lengthy footnotes where he develops this idea.

Rabbi Bodner's book makes no such distinction. In fact he even quotes Rav Moshe as saying that any object can be used for something and any kli she'melachto l'lisur is muttar l'tzorech gufo u'm'komo.

When I learnt muktzah recently my chavrusah and I had a hard time figuring out which object would go into class 1 or class 2 according to Rabbi Cohen. For example, a pen could in theory be used to point to lines in a sefer. But how about a radio? or a tape recorder? Is using it as a paperweight good enough or is that usage to unusual?

According to Rav Bodner's understanding of Rav Moshe it makes no difference.

I spoke to a posek who is a talmid of Rav Moshe and he said Rav Moshe did not differentiate between these 2 classes exactly like Rabbi Bodner presents it.

Chaim B. said...

You wrote:

>>>B'zman hazeh a shofar would be muktza machmas chisaron kis. It was only in the days of the gemara and Shulchan Aruch where they used it for other purposes that it was considered a kli sh'melachto l'issur

I understand why it is a kli shemelachto l'issur, but why does that lack of use for other purposes automatically make it muktzah machmas chisaron kis?

Chaim Markowitz said...

>>I understand why it is a kli shemelachto l'issur, but why does that lack of use for other purposes automatically make it muktzah machmas chisaron kis?


I didn't mean to imply that. I meant to compare shofar to a mila knife. A mila knife is chisaron kis. The reason is because one would never use the mila knife for anything else due to the "specialness" of the object and the fear of ruining it You could use it to cut an apple but you would never do so. Similarly a shofar also is not used for anthing else due to the fact that people treat it with care.

Barzilai said...

My impression is that Israeli poskim severely narrow the hetter of letzorech gufo/mekomo, while American poskim broaden it, as you brought from Reb Moshe. Same thing with machmas chisaron kis, whether it only applies to something that is melachto le'issur. That actually has interesting ramifications by a sakin shel millah, which it can be argued (unsuccessfully, but interestingly,) that it is not melachto le'issur on a shabbos when there's a bris.